Home » Polish Cavalry: Charge at Krojanty, Hussar, Polish Hussars, Battle of Mokra, Uhlan, Lisowczycy, 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade by Books LLC
Polish Cavalry: Charge at Krojanty, Hussar, Polish Hussars, Battle of Mokra, Uhlan, Lisowczycy, 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade Books LLC

Polish Cavalry: Charge at Krojanty, Hussar, Polish Hussars, Battle of Mokra, Uhlan, Lisowczycy, 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade

Books LLC

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781157042075
Paperback
44 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 43. Chapters: Charge at Krojanty, Hussar, Polish hussars, Battle of Mokra, Uhlan, Lisowczycy, 10th MotorizedMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 43. Chapters: Charge at Krojanty, Hussar, Polish hussars, Battle of Mokra, Uhlan, Lisowczycy, 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade, National Cavalry, Lancer, Polish cavalry brigade order of battle in 1939, Wo?y?ska Cavalry Brigade, Czapka, Chor?giew, Towarzysz pancerny, Battle of W lka W?glowa, Towarzysz husarski, Poczet, Petyhorcy. Excerpt: Hussar (, or spelling pronunciation ) refers to a number of types of light cavalry which originated in Hungary in the 14th century. A type of irregular light horsemen was already well established by the 15th century in medieval Hungary. Etymologists are divided over the derivation of the word hussar. Many scholars believe the word originated in Serbian as Husar, derived from the Latin root cursus meaning raid. According to Websters the word hussar stems from the Hungarian husz r, which in turn originates from the Serbian (Husar, or, Gusar) meaning pirate, from the Medieval Latin cursarius (cf. the English word corsair). A variant of this theory is offered by Byzantinist scholars, who argue the term originated in Roman military practice, and the cursarii (singular cursarius) - a group of fast-moving horsemen used for scouting or raiding-came to be called tsanarioi in Greek or the Armenian Chosarioi. Through Byzantine Army operations in the Balkans in the 10th and 11th centuries when Chosarioi/Chonsarioi were recruited with especially Serbs, the word was subsequently reintroduced to Western European military practice after its original usage had been lost with the collapse of Rome in the west. According to another theory, the word is derived from the Hungarian word h sz twenty, suggesting that hussar regiments were originally composed of twenty men. Or the term husz r probably signified one in twenty as selected for service by ballot. The hussars reportedly originated in b...